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Tuesday, July 15, 2014

'The M Word' DVD:A Slice of a Change of Life at an L.A. Television Station

Product Details
Today's indie great Breaking Glass Pictures DVD release of the comedy "The M Word" is a perfect companion for the concurrent Glass release of the 2009 film "Oy Vey! My Son is Gay" that Unreal TV recently reviewed.  Both movies are amusing looks at the reality of modern life.

"Word" is also notable for being a recent addition to the body of work by veteran independent film producer Henry Jaglom. The contributions of Jaglom in this one extend beyond writing and directing to using his home for several scenes. It is unknown if he additionally provides craft services, pulls wardrobe from his own closet, and/or builds sets.

Fans who have enjoyed the commentary of Jaglom on topics that include pregnancy and eating disorders should enjoy his take on the numerous topics in "Word."

"Word" centers around the chaos that ensues at an "WKRP in Cincinnati" style independent Los Angeles television station when the "suits" arrive to investigate embezzlement and evaluate the overall financial viability of the enterprise. The title refers to a proposal by station employee Moxie Landon to make and air a documentary about menopause.

The following clip, courtesy of YouTube, of the uber-spoiler-laden trailer for "Word" covers most of the topics of the film and provides a good sense of the humor in it. 

Like the aforementioned '70s sitcom, which tells the tales of a struggling AM radio station in the titular city, the KZAM staff is the wackiest group of folks you ever want to meet. Gregory Harrison of "Trapper John, M.D." plays Mack Riley, who is both the host of an extreme sports show and the estranged husband of Moxie's mother.

Former child actor (and more recently reality show star) Corey Feldman appears as the rather creepy and obnoxious Benny. This character is a co-worker from Hell who would be right at home at the cult classic workplace comedy "Office Space." 

Other employees include a 40-something actor who dons drag to star in the most bizarre children's show ever. This thespian's sidekick is a "keyboard kid" intern whose quirks include working shirtless and gleefully using webcams to spy on co-workers.

Additional humor relates to the modern "Ya Ya Sisterhood" that Moxie, her mother, and other female relatives form. The interests of this California-centric group extend beyond menopause to general peace, love, and understanding.

The disruption that hatchet-man Charlie Moon, who Michael Imperioli of "The Sopranos" plays with the proper understated tone, causes extends beyond concern regarding losing a job in an historically tight job market. His personal relationship with Moxie is a complication when she leads a rebellion regarding the plans that the corporate overlords have for KZAM.

The wide-ranging aforementioned social issues regarding all this include the true nature of the change of life, the economic viability of the remaining few "truly independent" television stations in the United States, the lack of privacy in modern life, the undue emphasis on the 18-to-49 demographic, and the intense power of social media. "Word" truly illustrates how public opinion can rapidly impose pressure to conform to the standards that it advocates.

The  market report regarding this one is that it is entertaining and has nice performances. The social commentary is a nice bonus.

Anyone with questions or comments regarding "Word" is welcome to email me; you can also connect on Twitter via @ tvdvdguy.